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Architecture

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Showing 1 - 20 from 25 entries

> Al Jib and the Wall
> Hebron: Rehabilitation and Reuse of Residential...
> Un-inventing the Bab al-Khalil tombs
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> Al-Manara Square: Monumental Architecture and Power
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> Architecture of Dependency: Senan Abdelqader
> The Politics and Poetics of Place: The Baramki House
> Architecture in Ramallah
> Sammara Public Baths
> Memoirs Engraved in Stone: Palestinian architecture
> Villa Salameh
> The Jabber neighbourhood in the old city of Hebron
> Outside kitchen
> Wood used in building
> Doorways: Arched and straight
> Modern way of building houses
> Storeys for the next generation
> Sultan Suleiman and Jerusalem’s Old City Walls
> Protecting Historic Town and Village Centres
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Wood used in building
   
submitted by Vinzenz Hokema
27.05.2006



Doors, windows and furniture were made from Oak (arabic: Ballout), Mahagoni, Teak, Katrani or other hardwood which had to be imported from Europe, thus being very expensive, but lasting very long.

Margueritte Lama's house, Manger Street, Bethlehem.

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